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The soaring, south face of Table Mountain where Cecil Rhodes came to be 'alone with the Alone'. He once told a visiting Bishop from England, 'I do not care to go to a particular Church, for I find if I go up the mountain I get thoughts - what you might call religious thoughts - because they are for the betterment of humanity.'
 
Rhodes Memorial against the monolithic backdrop of Table Mountain. One of Rhodes' greatest passions was the view of the mountain he enjoyed from his home at Groote Schuur. According to J.G. Macdonald, one of Rhodes' biographers, 'He always maintained that Table Mountain was the most beautiful mountain in the world. Its massive grandeur, its bold and vigorous outlines, and its impressive solitude appealed to his own idea of beauty....'We people here', he would say to his guests, 'broaden in our ideas and sympathies because we are always looking at the mountain.'   Rhodes' Memorial against the monolithic backdrop of Table Mountain.
 
Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain. Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain. Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain. Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain.
Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain. Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain. Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain. Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain.
Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain. Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain. Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain. Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain.
Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain. Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain. Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain. Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain.

Rhodes Memorial, situated on the slopes of Devil's Peak alongside Table Mountain, was inaugurated 10 years after Rhodes' death. Rudyard Kipling, who was a close personal friend of Rhodes, wrote how he had gone to the memorial by moonlight and found it `a thing to rejoice and sing over'.
 
The equestrian bronze statue at the Memorial points south-eastwards towards Rhodesia.   'Physical energy' - the equestrian bronze statue at the Memorial points north-eastwards towards Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). The statue was originally intended for Rhodes' grave in Rhodesia's Matopo Hills but the logistical problems of transporting it across southern Africa lead to its final inclusion in the Cape Town memorial.
 
The eight lions seated on the steps of the Memorial.   According to the architect of Rhodes Memorial, the bronze lions situated on the steps in front of the temple were inspired by the avenue of sphinxes leading to the Great Temple of Amen-Ra at Karnak, near Thebes in Egypt. Gazing outwards in the direction of Egypt, they form a physical expression of Rhodes' desire to advance Anglo-Saxon civilisation from 'Cape to Cairo'. Rhodes had a particular fondness for lions and kept two of them in a den at his Groote Schuur home.


The lion was one of the main symbols associated with Atum-Ra, the highest god of the Egyptian pantheon and from whose tears mankind was believed to have been born. The eight lions seen here in front of the temple building are thought to symbolise the eight deities created by Atum-Ra after he emerged from the Primal Waters at the beginning of time. They also echo the pairs of lions that in Egyptian art stand guard at the entrance to the ancestral realm of Osiris, the god of death and resurrection. Built from granite hewn from Table Mountain, the Memorial was designed by Rhodes' personal friend, biographer and architect, Sir Herbert Baker.